Vocabulary Cards: Food Your Child Should Know (Q to Z)

According to the MacArthur-Bates CDI Words and Sentences Assessment, these are the foods and drinks (Q to Z) that your child should know and, more importantly, say or sign.

Here are printable vocabulary cards you can use with your child.

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Words Your Child Should Know: Food and Drink (E to P)

According to the MacArthur-Bates CDI Words and Sentences Assessment, these are the food and drink your child should know and, more importantly, say or sign. Below each word is the word’s sign in ASL.

Egg

Fish

Food

French fries

Grapes

Green beans

Gum

Hamburger

Ice

Ice cream

Jello

  • Fingerspell

Jelly

Juice

Lollipop

Meat

Melon

Milk

Muffin

Noodles

Nuts

Orange

Pancake

Peanut butter

Peas

Pickle

Pizza

Popcorn

Popsicle

Potato

Potato chips

Pretzel

Pudding

Pumpkin

Vocabulary Cards: Food Your Child Should Know (E to P)

According to the MacArthur-Bates CDI Words and Sentences Assessment,

these are the foods and drinks that your child should know and, more importantly, say or sign.

Here are printable vocabulary cards you can use with your child.

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Vocabulary Cards: Toys Your Child Should Know

According to the MacArthur-Bates CDI Words and Sentences Assessment, 

these are the toys that your child should know and, more importantly, say or sign.

 

Here are printable vocabulary cards you can use with your child.

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Vocabulary Cards: Vehicles Your Child Should Know

According to the MacArthur-Bates CDI Words and Sentences assessment, these are the vehicles (real or toy) that your child should know and, more importantly, say or sign.

Here are printable vocabulary cards that you can use with your child or just as a reminder for yourself of targets to include in your every day language.

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Vocabulary Cards: Animals Your Child Should Know

According to the MacArthur-Bates CDI Words and Sentences Assessment, 

these are the animals (real or toy) that your child should know and, more importantly, say or sign.

 

Here are printable vocabulary cards you can use with your child.

 

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What is ASL?

American Sign Language (ASL) is a visual language. With signing, the brain processes linguistic information through the eyes. The shape, placement, and movement of the hands, as well as facial expressions and body movements, all play important parts in conveying information.

Sign language is not a universal language — each country has its own sign language, and regions have dialects, much like the many languages spoken all over the world. Like any spoken language, ASL is a language with its own unique rules of grammar and syntax. Like all languages, ASL is a living language that grows and changes over time.

ASL is used predominantly in the United States and in many parts of Canada. ASL is accepted by many high schools, colleges, and universities in fulfillment of modern and “foreign” language academic degree requirements across the United States.

Reference:

National Association of the Deaf

http://nad.org/issues/american-sign-language/what-is-asl

 

What does this language look like?

Check out AMP (Accessible Materials Project), which is based in Georgia. AMP provides video for those who use ASL or who are learning ASL. One of their many videos can be found here, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CnQY1aKWrFE. This video presents sight words in written English and in ASL. Words are fingerspelled and signed.

How To: Add Language To Your Daily Routines

Sara spends hours on the bus with Harry every week, to and from services, work, and daycare. Here is a language lesson that any parent like Sara could use to incorporate language into their daily bus ride.


HOW TO: Add language to a bus or train ride

https://www.atlantaspeechschool.org/TALK

  1. Using the TALK strategy: Become a narrator of your child’s world by using the TALK strategy and Tune In, Ask Questions, Lift the Language, and Keep it Going to what your child is looking at and naming it or describing what’s happening.
  2. Vocabulary: Tier 1 words (basic words) for younger children or children with 1-2 spoken/signed words (i.e. trees, cars, bus, train, people, eating, running, jumping, let’s hurry, uh oh!) and Tier 2 words for older children (3 years and up) or children with 3 or more words spoken or signed

101 Tier 2 Words:

1. Abundance- more than enough of something

2. Admire- to like the way something looks

3. Advice- what you think someone should do

4. Annoy- to bother

5. Appear-to show up

6. Arrange- to put something in order

7. Arrive- to get somewhere

8. Assist- to help

9. Astonished- very surprised

10. Attentive- pay attention

11. Available- ready to be used

12. Avoid- stay away from

13. Brief- a short time

14. Cautious- careful

15. Collect- to get things together; to pick up things that belong together

16. Combine- to mix or put together

17. Comfort- to make feel better

18. Comfortable- to feel good

19. Communicate- to let someone know what you think or feel

20. Compare- to see how things are alike and different

21. Complete- finish

22. Concentrate- to think about something really hard

23. Concerned- worried

24. Confused- when you don’t understand

25. Contain- to have or hold something inside

26. Corner- the point where 2 sides come together

27. Correct- right

28. Create- to make

29. Curious- want to know

30. Dangerous- not safe

31. Delighted- happy

32. Demonstrate- to show how to do something

33. Describe- to tell about something

34. Destroy- to tear up; to ruin

35. Determined- to keep working at something until you get what you want; to not give up

36. Difficult -hard to do

37. Disappear- to go away

38. Disappointed- upset because things did not work out the way you wanted them to

39. Discover- to find out about something

40. Dispose- to throw away; get rid of

41. Eager- really ready for something to happen

42. Edible- you can eat it

43. Enormous- really big

44. Entire- the whole thing; all of something

45. Envy- want what somebody else has

46. Equal- the same as

47. Event- something that happens

48. Except- all but

49. Excited- really happy about something; having a lot of energy

50. Expect- to think something will happen

51. Expensive- cost a lot of money

52. Extraordinary- really special; very different and wonderful

53. Familiar- you’ve seen it before or you already know it

54. Famous- known by a lot of people

55. Fancy- really special

56. Favorite- the one you like best

57. Fewer- not as many

58. Fragile- breaks or gets hurt easily; not strong

59. Frustrated- feeling upset when you keep trying to do something but it doesn’t work

60. Identical – the same in every way; exactly the same

61. Ignore- not pay attention to

62. Imitate- do the same thing somebody else does

63. Immense- really big; huge

64. Impossible- can’t be done

65. Introduce- to show for the first time; to meet for the first time

66. Invisible- you can’t see it

67. Locate- to find

68. Marvelous- wonderful

69. Observe- to watch carefully

70. Occupied- being used by someone else

71. Ordinary- plain; regular; not special

72. Organize- to put in good order

73. Patient- to wait nicely

74. Peculiar- strange

75. Pleased- happy with something

76. Plenty- a large amount; a lot

77. Popular- liked by a lot of people

78. Predict-to say or to guess what is going to happen

79. Problem- when something goes wrong

80. Protect- to keep safe

81. Protect- to keep safe

82. Proud- to feel good about yourself; to feel good about something you did

83. Purchase- to buy

84. Recall- to remember

85. Remain- to stay

86. Remove- take away

87. Repair- to fix

88. Repeat- to do again

89. Ridiculous- very silly

90. Select- to choose

91. Separate- take apart

92. Similar- the same in some ways but not all

93. Simple- easy to do

94. Solution- a way to fix something that went wrong

95. Supplies- things you need

96. Transfer- to move from one place to another

97. Unusual- different; really special; not familiar

98. Useful- can be used a lot

99. Vanish- to go away fast

100. Variety- different kinds of one thing

101. Visible- you can see it

Monday: A Day in the Life

Meet Harry, who is 24 months old. He was identified at 8 months old with a profound hearing loss. He now has bilateral cochlear implants. His mom, Sara, has chosen Listening & Spoken Language as his modality. They receive services at the Auditory Verbal Center.

8:03 AM
Sara has slept through her alarm and baby Harry’s auditory-verbal therapy is at 10 AM on the other side of town. When Sara realizes this, she rushes to get Harry up and ready to go. Their bus picks them up at 8:25, so they don’t have even a second to lose. If they miss this bus, they will miss their therapy appointment, which will take another four weeks to reschedule. At 8:24, they make it to their bus stop, which is, luckily, right outside their apartment. They hop on the bus and head off to the Auditory Verbal Center.

Sara has been tossing and turning for the past six months, ever since her pediatrician told her that if Harry doesn’t receive the proper early intervention services, he will not have the language he needs to learn how to read. Sara’s a single mother whose worries range from How will I make rent this month? to Will my baby ever talk?
She wonders if she’s reading to him enough, talking to him enough, interacting with him enough.
Harry is a happy baby, interested in the world around him and the new sounds he hears every day. He enjoys reading books with his mommy and he has just started saying “mama.” Sara was overjoyed to hear her baby boy speak her name…