How To: Add Language To Your Daily Routines

Sara spends hours on the bus with Harry every week, to and from services, work, and daycare. Here is a language lesson that any parent like Sara could use to incorporate language into their daily bus ride.


HOW TO: Add language to a bus or train ride

https://www.atlantaspeechschool.org/TALK

  1. Using the TALK strategy: Become a narrator of your child’s world by using the TALK strategy and Tune In, Ask Questions, Lift the Language, and Keep it Going to what your child is looking at and naming it or describing what’s happening.
  2. Vocabulary: Tier 1 words (basic words) for younger children or children with 1-2 spoken/signed words (i.e. trees, cars, bus, train, people, eating, running, jumping, let’s hurry, uh oh!) and Tier 2 words for older children (3 years and up) or children with 3 or more words spoken or signed

101 Tier 2 Words:

1. Abundance- more than enough of something

2. Admire- to like the way something looks

3. Advice- what you think someone should do

4. Annoy- to bother

5. Appear-to show up

6. Arrange- to put something in order

7. Arrive- to get somewhere

8. Assist- to help

9. Astonished- very surprised

10. Attentive- pay attention

11. Available- ready to be used

12. Avoid- stay away from

13. Brief- a short time

14. Cautious- careful

15. Collect- to get things together; to pick up things that belong together

16. Combine- to mix or put together

17. Comfort- to make feel better

18. Comfortable- to feel good

19. Communicate- to let someone know what you think or feel

20. Compare- to see how things are alike and different

21. Complete- finish

22. Concentrate- to think about something really hard

23. Concerned- worried

24. Confused- when you don’t understand

25. Contain- to have or hold something inside

26. Corner- the point where 2 sides come together

27. Correct- right

28. Create- to make

29. Curious- want to know

30. Dangerous- not safe

31. Delighted- happy

32. Demonstrate- to show how to do something

33. Describe- to tell about something

34. Destroy- to tear up; to ruin

35. Determined- to keep working at something until you get what you want; to not give up

36. Difficult -hard to do

37. Disappear- to go away

38. Disappointed- upset because things did not work out the way you wanted them to

39. Discover- to find out about something

40. Dispose- to throw away; get rid of

41. Eager- really ready for something to happen

42. Edible- you can eat it

43. Enormous- really big

44. Entire- the whole thing; all of something

45. Envy- want what somebody else has

46. Equal- the same as

47. Event- something that happens

48. Except- all but

49. Excited- really happy about something; having a lot of energy

50. Expect- to think something will happen

51. Expensive- cost a lot of money

52. Extraordinary- really special; very different and wonderful

53. Familiar- you’ve seen it before or you already know it

54. Famous- known by a lot of people

55. Fancy- really special

56. Favorite- the one you like best

57. Fewer- not as many

58. Fragile- breaks or gets hurt easily; not strong

59. Frustrated- feeling upset when you keep trying to do something but it doesn’t work

60. Identical – the same in every way; exactly the same

61. Ignore- not pay attention to

62. Imitate- do the same thing somebody else does

63. Immense- really big; huge

64. Impossible- can’t be done

65. Introduce- to show for the first time; to meet for the first time

66. Invisible- you can’t see it

67. Locate- to find

68. Marvelous- wonderful

69. Observe- to watch carefully

70. Occupied- being used by someone else

71. Ordinary- plain; regular; not special

72. Organize- to put in good order

73. Patient- to wait nicely

74. Peculiar- strange

75. Pleased- happy with something

76. Plenty- a large amount; a lot

77. Popular- liked by a lot of people

78. Predict-to say or to guess what is going to happen

79. Problem- when something goes wrong

80. Protect- to keep safe

81. Protect- to keep safe

82. Proud- to feel good about yourself; to feel good about something you did

83. Purchase- to buy

84. Recall- to remember

85. Remain- to stay

86. Remove- take away

87. Repair- to fix

88. Repeat- to do again

89. Ridiculous- very silly

90. Select- to choose

91. Separate- take apart

92. Similar- the same in some ways but not all

93. Simple- easy to do

94. Solution- a way to fix something that went wrong

95. Supplies- things you need

96. Transfer- to move from one place to another

97. Unusual- different; really special; not familiar

98. Useful- can be used a lot

99. Vanish- to go away fast

100. Variety- different kinds of one thing

101. Visible- you can see it

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A “Hopping” Good Time: Language Activity for Easter!

veryhungrybunny

Here’s an awesome, interactive mini-book, featured on the website Playing with Words 365, about The Very Hungry Bunny. It’s a fun language-building activity for spring and for Easter, which is right around the corner. The book works on “building vocabulary, answering questions, counting, color ID, and more.”

Check out the website, www.playingwithwords365.com, by amazing mom/Speech Language Pathologist, Katie. Here is a glimpse at her credentials –

  • Bachelor’s degree in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology
  • Master’s degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders
  • State License in Speech Language Pathology
  • Rehabilitation Services Credential
  • Certificate in Clinical Competence (CCC) though the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA)

Not too shabby! And by that, I mean “darn impressive!” And the activities she features on her website will knock your pretty, polka-dotted socks off!

Enjoy!

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To learn more about Georgia Pathway to Language and Literacy, please visit our website at www.georgialiteracy.org or email us at gapathway@gmail.com.

Great News For Those Who Missed It…

I was overjoyed when I discovered that…

Dr. Beth Benedict’s ENTIRE talk on Early Intervention can be found online! In ASL, with spoken English interpretation.

Visit http://webcast.gallaudet.edu/?id=115 to watch Dr. Benedict’s lecture.

It is a must-see.

A big thank you to Gallaudet University for offering Dr. Benedict’s lecture to those of us outside the Gallaudet community! We appreciate you!

 

To learn more about Georgia Pathway to Language & Literacy, please visit our website or email us at gapathway@gmail.com.

Manic Monday: The Three Little Pigs in ASL

For all you Pathfinders out there who are trying to make it through another Monday without huffing and puffing and blowing your house down…

Signed by Maisha Franklin and produced by ASLized.

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For more information about Georgia Pathway to Language and Literacy, please visit our website at www.georgialiteracy.org or email us at gapathway@gmail.com.

Infants, Toddlers, and Families: Collaboration and Leadership Program

When I visited GSD (Georgia School for the Deaf) on Tuesday, I met a woman from Gallaudet University, a professor who is spending her time helping the faculty and students at GSD become a bilingual school (ASL and written English). We got to talking about Georgia Pathway and professional development, and she mentioned the ITF program at Gallaudet (which can be taken online if you aren’t from D.C.). We believe in the power of Early Intervention at Georgia Pathway, so, needless to say, I was thrilled to hear that there was a program to certify professionals who serve the deaf and hard of hearing community.

Here’s a video that will give you a little bit of information on the program (and you may just recognize the woman on the right – Dr. Beth Benedict!)…

More information can be found on the Gallaudet website, http://www.gallaudet.edu/x57447.xml.

We’ve also included the course description below:

“The Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and their Families: Collaboration and Leadership Interdisciplinary Graduate Certificate Program is a hybrid program (online and on-campus instruction) that provides professionals from a wide range of disciplines with current evidence-based knowledge and skills for working with families and their very young children who are deaf or hard of hearing. The content and teaching of the program is interdisciplinary and provides an overview of professional and ethical practices, communication and language(s), families, and developmental assessment and programming. Candidates will acquire leadership, advocacy and collaboration skills that promote age and developmentally appropriate outcomes for infants and toddlers. All coursework and experiences reflect principles of diversity including understanding and appreciation of language diversity (ASL and English, as well as other home languages). This 7-course graduate certificate can be taken in conjunction with another graduate program at Gallaudet or another university, or as a post graduate program for professionals who have current or prospective employment in a program for deaf and hard of hearing infants, toddlers and their families.

The program focuses on the acquisition of knowledge and skills in four broad content areas. These areas include: 1) Professional and Ethical Practices, 2) Communication and Language, 3) Families, Cultures and Communities, and 4) Development, Assessment and Programming. Units of instruction are developed and taught by professionals with expertise in working with infants, toddlers and their families from a wide array of disciplinary backgrounds including, ASL and Deaf studies, communication studies, counseling, education, linguistics, psychology, speech-language-hearing, and social work. Bilingual (ASL – English) principles and philosophical perspectives are infused into the curriculum content and delivery of coursework and experiences. Each course will be offered for graduate or professional studies credits and will be co-taught by faculty from different disciplines. Units of instruction are developed and taught by professionals with expertise in working with infants, toddlers and their families from a wide array of disciplinary backgrounds including, ASL and Deaf studies, communication studies, counseling, education, linguistics, psychology, speech-language-hearing, and social work. Bilingual (ASL – English) principles and philosophical perspectives are infused into the curriculum content and delivery of coursework and experiences. Each course will be offered for graduate or professional studies credits and will be co-taught by faculty from different disciplines.

The program consists of 18 credit hours. The first course is a hybrid summer course of three-days on campus followed by online coursework. The second course is also during the first summer and is completely online. The next four courses are online during the fall and spring semesters. The seventh and final course begins with an online portion and concludes with a three-day on-campus seminar. The program includes an individually designed capstone project. The capstone project must be completed before the awarding of the certificate.

Online courses provide access to information through American Sign Language and English (e.g., presentations will be available through American Sign Language and spoken English or English captions).”

 

If you’re interested in learning more about Georgia Pathway to Language & Literacy, please visit our website at www.georgialiteracy.org or email us at gapathway@gmail.com.

Mom to the Rescue: A Story of Early Intervention and Beating the Odds

Ever heard of Rachel Coleman?

She’s the very animated lady you see in all the Signing Time videos.

rachel_ilu

That’s her.

She is the mother of a daughter who is deaf and another daughter who has special physical needs.

And her story is incredible.

Her courage, her tenacity, her faith in her child.

She’s an inspiration to all mothers, fathers, families, teachers who work tirelessly to create language-rich environments for children who are deaf and hard of hearing.

I spent an hour watching her presentation, “One Deaf Child,” and I couldn’t have chosen a better way to spend my afternoon.

Check it out! You’ll be glad you did.

Our little caterpillars do become butterflies and what I’ve found is that sign language often gives them their wings.

Language Skills & Temper Tantrums

Children with good language skills at age two were less likely to have temper tantrums and other outbursts at age four according to recent research. Researchers found that there is a strong connection between a child’s ability to manage frustration and early language skills.

In research settings likely to produce frustration and anger, children with better developed language coped by using language to seek their mother’s support and to occupy themselves during a potentially frustrating wait.

The connection between language and emotional regulation in the early years has been found in other research, but this is the first time the findings have been confirmed in a longitudinal study. By examining the children over a 30 month period researchers at Penn State and the University of Delaware showed that behavior at age 2 (good language skills) can predict behavior at age 4 (better emotional regulation).

The study appears in the journal Child Development and can be found online at Washington Learning Systems.

Roben, C. K. P., Cole, P. M. and Armstrong, L. M. (2012), Longitudinal Relations Among Language Skills, Anger Expression, and Regulatory Strategies in Early Childhood. Child Development. doi: 10.1111/cdev.12027