Vocabulary Cards: Food and Drink (A to D)

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Words Your Child Should Know: Food and Drink (A to D)

Below are words your child should know about food and drink, A to D, with the word’s corresponding ASL sign.

*These words were selected from the MacArthur-Bates CDI Words and Sentences assessment.

Vocabulary Cards: Toys Your Child Should Know

According to the MacArthur-Bates CDI Words and Sentences Assessment, 

these are the toys that your child should know and, more importantly, say or sign.

 

Here are printable vocabulary cards you can use with your child.

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Words Your Child Should Know: Toys

Below are toys, and their ASL sign, that your child should know:

*These words were selected from the MacArthur-Bates CDI Words and Sentences Assessment.

 

Vocabulary Cards: Vehicles Your Child Should Know

According to the MacArthur-Bates CDI Words and Sentences assessment, these are the vehicles (real or toy) that your child should know and, more importantly, say or sign.

Here are printable vocabulary cards that you can use with your child or just as a reminder for yourself of targets to include in your every day language.

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Words Your Child Should Know: Vehicles

Vehicles your child should know, with the corresponding sign in ASL:

*These words were selected from the MacArthur-Bates CDI Words and Sentences assessment. 

Vocabulary Cards: Animals Your Child Should Know

According to the MacArthur-Bates CDI Words and Sentences Assessment, 

these are the animals (real or toy) that your child should know and, more importantly, say or sign.

 

Here are printable vocabulary cards you can use with your child.

 

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Words Your Child Should Know: Animals (P to Z) in ASL

Animals your child should know, from P to Z, with videos of their corresponding sign:

*These words were selected from the MacArthur-Bates CDI Words and Sentences assessment.

Words Your Child Should Know: Animals (E to O) in ASL:

Animals your child should know, from E to O, and in 

*These words are selected from the MacArthur-Bates CDI Words and Sentences assessment.

What Is…Executive Function?

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Executive function is a set of mental processes that helps connect past experience with present action. People use it to perform activities such as:

  • planning,
  • organizing,
  • strategizing,
  • paying attention to and remembering details, and
  • managing time and space.

How Does Executive Function Affect Learning?

In school, at home or in the workplace, we’re called on all day, every day, to self-regulate behavior. Executive function allows us to:

  • Make plans
  • Keep track of time and finish work on time
  • Keep track of more than one thing at once
  • Meaningfully include past knowledge in discussions
  • Evaluate ideas and reflect on our work
  • Change our minds and make mid-course corrections while thinking, reading and writing
  • Ask for help or seek more information when we need it
  • Engage in group dynamics
  • Wait to speak until we’re called on

What Are the Warning Signs of Executive Function Problems?

A student may have problems with executive function when he or she has trouble:

  • Planning projects
  • Comprehending how much time a project will take to complete
  • Telling stories (verbally or in writing), struggling to communicate details in an organized, sequential manner
  • Memorizing and retrieving information from memory
  • Initiating activities or tasks, or generating ideas independently
  • Retaining information while doing something with it, for example, remembering a phone number while dialing

Source: http://www.ncld.org/types-learning-disabilities/executive-function-disorders/what-is-executive-function