We Need You! (Yes, you)

Are you…

a parent of a child who is deaf or hard of hearing

a sibling of a child or adult who is deaf or hard of hearing

a deaf adult

a teacher of deaf education

an audiologist

an SLP who works with deaf and hard of hearing children

an ASL interpreter

a family member of a child who is deaf or hard of hearing

an advocate for the d/hh

an administrator

or public health professional?

Oh, you are?

Great!

featured-we-want-you

Take this ONE MINUTE survey (yes, only one minute…provided you aren’t too technologically un-savvy) to help Georgia Pathway serve you and Georgia’s D/HH children better best!

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/ZMTKKP5

If you know anyone else who fits the bill, please pass this along to them, too. Thanks, y’all. We appreciate you.

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Research Presentation: Language & Literacy

GSU Flyer

Don’t miss this presentation by Dr. Kim Wolbers of University of Tennessee!

It’s here in Atlanta.

It’s FREE.

There will be ASL interpretation.

There’s no reason you should miss this, right?

Right.

See you there on MAY 13th, Pathfinders!

To learn more about Georgia Pathway to Language & Literacy, please visit our website at www.georgialiteracy.org or email us at gapathway@gmail.com.

5 Reasons to Follow Georgia Pathway on Pinterest

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Yes, it’s true! We’re on Pinterest!

An exciting venture for us and an opportunity for the Pathway community to share in an easy and accessible way.

Here are 5 reasons you should follow us on Pinterest:

1. An educational Pinterest board is a much better substitute for Facebook addicts (i.e. those who “like” every post related to cats, those who check Facebook multiple times within the hour, etc.).

2. You can combine your love of pinning with your love of Deaf Education.

3. When your boss catches you surfing Pinterest in the middle of your work day, you can tell her that you’re actually being productive, that you’re broadening your knowledge of the children you serve.

4. If pictures are more appealing to you than links, statuses, tweets, and “likes,” our Pinterest board is the place to be. Because, let’s be real, after a long day at work, you don’t want to read page after page in order to find helpful resources; you want pictures with a simple caption.

5. We want to follow you on Pinterest, too. Georgia Pathway is, after all, a community, and we are hoping to share information, to help one another grow as we tackle the goal of literacy for every deaf and hard of hearing child in Georgia by 2020.

Making an account is easy. Once you do, come on by and check us out!

You can find us at http://pinterest.com/georgiapathway/

Just do it. It won’t be the same without ya!

To learn more about Georgia Pathway to Language & Literacy, please visit our website at www.georgialiteracy.org or email us at gapathway@gmail.com.

12 Goals for Quality Care of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children, as outlined by the JCIH

The Joint Committee of Infant Hearing (JCIH) recently published a supplement to the JCIH 2007 Position Statement: Principles and Guidelines for Early Intervention After Confirmation That a Child Is Deaf or Hard of Hearing.

Abbreviations:

ASL = American Sign Language

CDC = Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

D/HH = deaf and hard of hearing

EHDI = early hearing detection and intervention

EI = early intervention

IDEA = Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act

IFSP = individualized family service plan

JCIH = Joint Committee on Infant Hearing

The article outlines 12 best practices or goals “to facilitate the development of systems that are capable of continuously evaluating and improving the quality of care for infants/children who are D/HH and their families…[and] to promote quality assurance of EI programs from children from birth to age 3 years and their families.”

Goal 1: All children who are D/HH and their families have access to timely and coordinated entry into EI programs supported by a data management system capable of tracking families and children from confirmation of hearing loss to enrollment into EI services

Goal 2: All children who are D/HH and their families experience timely access to services coordinators who have specialized knowledge and skills related to working with individuals who are D/HH

Goal 3: All children who are D/HH from birth to 3 years of age and their families have EI providers who have the professional qualifications and core knowledge and skills to optimize the child’s development and child/family well-being

Goal 3a: Intervention services to teach ASL will be provided by professionals who have native or fluent skills and are trained to teach parents/families and young children

Goal 3b: Intervention services to develop listening and spoken language will be provided by professionals who have specialized skills and knowledge

Goal 4: All children who are D/HH with additional disabilities and their families have access to specialists who have the professional qualifications and specialized knowledge and skills to support and promote optimal developmental outcomes

Goal 5: All children who are D/HH and their families from culturally diverse backgrounds and/or from non-English-speaking homes have access to culturally competent services with provision of the same quality and quantity of information given to families from the majority culture

Goal 6: All children who are D/HH should have their progress monitored every 6 months from birth to 36 months of age, through a protocol that includes the use of standardized, norm-referenced developmental evaluations, for language (spoken and/or signed), the modality of communication (auditory, visual, and/or augmentative), social-emotional, cognitive, and fine and gross motor skills

Goal 7: All children who are identified with hearing loss of any degree, including those with unilateral or slight hearing loss, those with auditory neural hearing loss (Auditory Neuropathy), and those with progressive or fluctuating hearing loss, receive appropriate monitoring and immediate follow-up intervention services where appropriate

Goal 8: Families will be active participants in the development and implementation of EHDI systems at the state/territory and local levels

Goal 9: All families will have access to other families who have children who are D/HH and who are appropriately trained to provide culturally and linguistically sensitive support, mentorship, and guidance

Goal 10: Individuals who are D/HH will be active participants in the development and implementation of EHDI systems at the national, state/territory, and local levels; their participation will be an expected and integral component of the EHDI systems

Goal 11: All children who are D/HH and their families have access to support, mentorship, and guidance from individuals who are D/HH

Goal 12: As best practices are increasingly identified and implemented, all children who are D/HH and their families will be ensured of fidelity in the implementation of the intervention they receive

To read the entire article online, please visit:

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2013/03/18/peds.2013-0008.citation

Manic Monday: Purple Bread, a Story in ASL

Video

This video is presented in ASL with spoken English interpretation.

Many thanks to the Accessible Materials Project (AMP) for providing such a wonderful variety of videos in ASL! Check out their YouTube channel here.

For more information about Georgia Pathway to Language & Literacy, please visit our website at www.georgialiteracy.org or email us at gapathway@gmail.com.

 

“I See What You Mean”: Visualizing English Grammar

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Gallaudet University is quickly becoming my favorite resource for video lectures. They have speakers discussing everything under the sun.

Here’s one presentation that I thought would be very useful and informative for our Pathfinders who teach students in ASL.

Dr. Kristin Di Perri is an independent literacy consultant. The VL2 website describes her presentation:

Research on visual language and learning for deaf children continues to underscore the necessity for a pedagogical revision in the way we teach English literacy skills. However, there is often a disconnect between research implications and the actual implementation of effective instruction. In this presentation, Dr. Di Perri discussed an interactive instructional approach for teaching English grammatical elements in a manner that maximizes visual information and retention/internalization of concepts.”

I don’t mean to fool you.

This presentation has already happened.

But you can watch it (as many times as your heart desires) online at http://videocatalog.gallaudet.edu/?id=14328.

This presentation is in spoken English with ASL interpretation and captions.

Enjoy (and let us know what you think)!

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To learn more about Georgia Pathway to Language & Literacy, please visit our website at www.georgialiteracy.org or email us at gapathway@gmail.com.

Check It Out! … A Storybook App for Learning ASL

If you’re looking for a new, exciting way to teach your child or student ASL, check out this app, The Baobab, created by some of the foremost researchers and educators in Deaf Education at Gallaudet University.

The-Baobab

Description from iTunes:

The Baobab is an original story about a curious little girl who embarks on an adventure. Complete with enthralling illustrations and talented American Sign Language (ASL) storytelling, this bilingual interactive storybook app features a rich American Sign Language glossary with 170 English to ASL words.
Features:

• Original and charming story told in ASL and English!
• Vivid Retina supported watercolor illustrations.
• Easy & accessible navigation designed for children.
• Rich interactive narrative with direct English to ASL vocabulary video translation.
• Audio voice-over provided for all vocabulary words.
• 170-word American Sign Language glossary! Parents can learn ASL along with their child.
• App design is based on proven research in bilingualism and visual learning. The ability to view the story in both, ASL and English leads to greater literacy skills in both languages in young children.

All the revenues from this app will go towards research and further development of more storybook apps.

Reviews of The Baobab App:

“This storybook app is simply outstanding. The illustrations, the video quality, the story itself – WOW. And it even teaches you ASL!”

“I am a bilingual Deaf person, and this one of the best ASL (American Sign Language)/English books I’ve seen. It is very easy to use and a great way to learn ASL and English. I would highly recommend this for anyone who wants to be bilingual in the two languages.”

“What a top-notch app designed for ASL/English bilinguals and ASL-curious children! The VL2 team have raised the bar for what a quality ASL/English ebook should look like. I especially loved the beautiful loud-popping illustrations. Also, one feature I really appreciated was the uninterrupted ASL story with animated effects in the background. Oh, by the way, the hummingbirds were so cute!

The app does a wonderful job of creating a bridge between American Sign Language and English, giving children the flexibility to learn and use both languages interchangeably. We need MORE of that, so I’m really excited to see what they will come up next! What a great addition to a small yet growing collection of ASL/English eBooks!”

Created by VL2 and Gallaudet University

 

To learn more about Georgia Pathway to Language & Literacy, please visit our website at www.georgialiteracy.org or email us at gapathway@gmail.com.

Great News For Those Who Missed It…

I was overjoyed when I discovered that…

Dr. Beth Benedict’s ENTIRE talk on Early Intervention can be found online! In ASL, with spoken English interpretation.

Visit http://webcast.gallaudet.edu/?id=115 to watch Dr. Benedict’s lecture.

It is a must-see.

A big thank you to Gallaudet University for offering Dr. Benedict’s lecture to those of us outside the Gallaudet community! We appreciate you!

 

To learn more about Georgia Pathway to Language & Literacy, please visit our website or email us at gapathway@gmail.com.

Manic Monday: The Three Little Pigs in ASL

For all you Pathfinders out there who are trying to make it through another Monday without huffing and puffing and blowing your house down…

Signed by Maisha Franklin and produced by ASLized.

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For more information about Georgia Pathway to Language and Literacy, please visit our website at www.georgialiteracy.org or email us at gapathway@gmail.com.