A Day in the Life: Meet Lanie

Lanie is a year old, whose parents just found out she is deaf. They have just chosen ASL as her modality…

 

8:26 AM

Lanie is sitting in her high chair with mom, Linda, who is feeding her. Linda is doing her best to push in as much language every day as she possibly can, but she’s learning ASL along with Lanie and has become very confused and frustrated with the difference in ASL’s grammatical structure. Linda wonders, How will we learn this language at the same rate Lanie is? Have we made the right choice? 

 

Linda has been carrying a world of guilt on her shoulders. Asking herself constantly, How did I not know that my child was deaf? How did I miss this? 

Spotlight on Service: Marcus Autism Center

Marcus-Autism-Center

Below is an excerpt from the Marcus Autism Center website. For more information, visit http://www.marcus.org.


 

“Marcus Autism Center is a not-for-profit organization and subsidiary of Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta that treats more than 5,500 children with autism and related disorders a year.

 

As one of the largest autism centers in the U.S. and one of only three National Institutes of Health (NIH) Autism Centers of Excellence, Marcus Autism Center offers families access to the latest research, comprehensive evaluations and intensive behavior treatments. With the help of research grants, community support and government funding, Marcus Autism Center aims to maximize the potential of children with autism today and transform the nature of autism for future generations.

 

With a wide spectrum of services and evidence-based treatments, families can receive diagnosis, treatment and support in a single location. Treating patients across Georgia and the Southeast, Marcus Autism Center is the comprehensive resourcefor children with autism and related disorders.

 

Marcus Autism Center, in conjunction with Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and through collaborations with premier academic institutions nationwide, is bringing groundbreaking research and clinical services to children and families affected by autism.

 

With the appointment of Ami Klin, Ph.D., Director of Marcus Autism Center, we are pursuing an overarching research strategy, with two main areas of focus—early detection and early intervention. This will be accomplished, in part, by Dr. Klin’s eye-tracking software, which has been shown to diagnose children as young as 6 months old. We hope that this will help future generations of children get the care they need.”

A Day in the Life: Meet Stephanie

Stephanie is 8 years old. She was identified at 1 ½ years old with a moderate hearing loss. She was diagnosed at 5 years old with autism. Her parents, Dan and Shelly, work full time and they just welcomed a newborn to their family. Stephanie attends school at the public school down the street from her house.

 

7:15 AM

 

Dan is out of town on business, and Shelly is scrambling to get Stephanie out the door on time. Her bus arrives at 7:30 and Stephanie is just now getting dressed. Shelly tries to get Stephanie to move more quickly, but Shelly is also holding a crying newborn. Juggling two children has proved more difficult than Shelly imagined. In the hustle and bustle of the morning, she forgets to put new batteries in Stephanie’s hearing aids.

 

Lately, with things being more hectic around their home, Stephanie’s progress has waned and Dan and Shelly are concerned. Stephanie is not reading on grade level and the other children in her class are making age-appropriate academic gains. They are on the waiting list at the Marcus Autism Center’s Language and Learning Clinic, where Stephanie will receive services to help her improve her communication and social skills.


 

What is ASL?

American Sign Language (ASL) is a visual language. With signing, the brain processes linguistic information through the eyes. The shape, placement, and movement of the hands, as well as facial expressions and body movements, all play important parts in conveying information.

Sign language is not a universal language — each country has its own sign language, and regions have dialects, much like the many languages spoken all over the world. Like any spoken language, ASL is a language with its own unique rules of grammar and syntax. Like all languages, ASL is a living language that grows and changes over time.

ASL is used predominantly in the United States and in many parts of Canada. ASL is accepted by many high schools, colleges, and universities in fulfillment of modern and “foreign” language academic degree requirements across the United States.

Reference:

National Association of the Deaf

http://nad.org/issues/american-sign-language/what-is-asl

 

What does this language look like?

Check out AMP (Accessible Materials Project), which is based in Georgia. AMP provides video for those who use ASL or who are learning ASL. One of their many videos can be found here, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CnQY1aKWrFE. This video presents sight words in written English and in ASL. Words are fingerspelled and signed.

Spotlight on Service: Sign Language Interpreters

Below is a list of sign language interpreter services in Georgia. 

 

Communication Access Network, Inc.

888-566-5585 (voice/TTY)

www.caninterpreters.com

Provides comprehensive communications services through a network of interpreters and independent consultants.

 

Georgia Interpreting Services Network

800-228-4992 (voice/TTY)

www.gisn.info

Contact: Marilyn Teague (Senior Assignment Coordinator), info@gisn.info

Non-profit organization providing certified sign language interpreting 24/7/365 for all of Georgia since 1987.

 

Georgia Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf, Inc.

www.garid.org

 

The Interpreting Connection, Inc.

1706 Tree Corners Parkway

Norcross, GA 30092-3129

770-613-0925 (voice/TTY)

Contact: Debbie Lesser (founder), debann@mindspring.com

 

Don Clark and Associates, Inc.

4651 Woodstock Road, Suite 208

Roswell, GA 30075

770-926-1667

Contact: Don Clark (President/CEO),  don@donclarkandassociates.com

www.DCA-GA.com

Sign language interpreting services. “Where words have meaning.”

 

Medley Interpreters, LLC

quality . communication . connections

770.978.3120

770.978.3121 fax

www.medleyinterpreters.com

 

National Alliance of Black Interpreters, Inc.

www.naobi.org

 

Sign Language Interpreting Specialists, Inc.

130C John Morrow Parkway

Gainesville, GA 30501-3569

770-531-0700 (voice), 770-287-9479 (TTY)}

www.slisinc.com

Contact: Ruth Dubin, slisinc@charter.net

Sign language interpreting services available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year for all settings (e.g. medical, legal, educational).

 

Reference: http://www.gahandsandvoices.org/Resources.html

Language Lesson: Fingerspelling

Deaf teachers use visual strategies for incorporating fingerspelling into classroom instruction. Studies on these visual strategies show that they are a natural part of classroom interaction and are used to promote greater understanding and retention of academic material.

 

Three such instructional strategies for using fingerspelling are as follows:

 

(1) Chaining, (2) Sandwiching, and (3) Lexicalized Fingerspelling.

 

Chaining

 

Chaining is used for introducing new concepts or new vocabulary terms. Chaining creates associations by connecting signs, fingerspelling, and the printed/written word in a sequence, with one format reinforcing the previous one. Through chaining, the teacher provides multiple ways for the students to learn the word and concept. In addition, teachers may use objects, pictures, or multimedia to reinforce the concepts. For example, when teaching the word, tornado, a teacher might choose one of the following sequences:

 

1) Point to the word tornado written on the board;

2) fingerspell T-O-R-N-A-D-O; and

3) sign TORNADO.

 

Or:

 

1) Fingerspell T-O-R-N-A-D-O;

2) sign TORNADO; and

3) write tornado on the board.

 

Sandwiching

The sandwiching technique alternates between fingerspelling and signing. This method also reinforces the equivalency of ASL and English.

 

1) Fingerspell T-O-R-N-A-D-O;

2) sign TORNADO; and

3) fingerspell T-O-R-N-A-D-O again.

 

Or:

 

1) Sign TORNADO;

2) fingerspell T-O-R-N-A-D-O; and

3) sign TORNADO again.

 

Lexicalized Fingerspelling

New signs are created through a process where fingerspelled words are altered or lexicalized to become more sign-like. Commonly referred to as loan signs, these signs sometimes omit letters (#JOB) while others blend the handshapes seamlessly (#BUS). Through this process, a loan sign is formed. Lexicalized fingerspelled signs include nouns, verbs, adjectives, conjunctions, interjections and wh-words. Lexicalized fingerspelling transforms the fingerspelled word into a sign-like visual image. Deaf teachers often use this technique; first, they produce a neutral version of a fingerspelled word, and then follow that with a lexicalized version. This process supports visual memory and facilitates retention.

 

Common Fingerspelled Loan Signs

#BANK #BACK #OFF #ON #IF

#SALE #EARLY #BUT #BUS #CAR

#WHAT #DO #SO #OK #JOB

#YES #NO #DOG #TOY #FIX

 

 

What does lexicalized fingerspelling look like?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S8soqLZgPek


 

Reference:

Visual Language and Visual Learning Science of Learning Center. (2010, July). The Importance of Fingerspelling for Reading. (Research Brief No. 1). Washington, DC: Sharon Baker.

 


 

Research: “The Importance of Fingerspelling for Reading”

“The Importance of Fingerspelling for Reading”
Visual Language & Visual Learning (VL2)
What is fingerspelling?
On the most simplistic level, fingerspelling can be defined as the use of handshapes to represent letters of the alphabet.

Key Findings on the Importance of Fingerspelling for Reading:
• Deaf families fingerspell to their deaf children when they are very young.
• Early exposure to fingerspelling helps these children become better readers.
• Fingerspelling, reading, and writing are interrelated.
• Fingerspelling facilitates English vocabulary growth, and larger the lexicon, the faster new vocabulary is learned.
• Fingerspelling positively correlates with stronger reading skills. Deaf and hard of hearing children who are good fingerspellers are good readers, and vice versa.

Source:
Visual Language and Visual Learning Science of Learning Center. (2010, July). The Importance of Fingerspelling for Reading. (Research Brief No. 1). Washington, DC: Sharon Baker.

A Day in the Life: Meet Franklin

Meet Franklin who is 5 years old. He is profoundly deaf and was identified at 1 year old. His parents, who are hearing, have chosen ASL as his modality. He is in kindergarten in a mainstream classroom.

4:03 PM

Franklin is just arriving home after a long 7 hour school day. He is hot and sweaty after his 45 minute bus commute from school to his house. He has homework to do – read a book and draw a picture of his favorite scene in the book. He can’t read yet, so he has to wait until his parents are able to read to him and help him with his homework.

Franklin is preparing for his homework activity by setting up on the kitchen table his paper, colored pencils, and the book he’s chosen. Mom works from home but doesn’t finish work until 5 PM. Dad won’t be home until much later, usually after 9 PM. Mom is a hearing parent whose ASL has improved greatly over the past several years, but she doesn’t feel confident in her ability communicating with Franklin.

Spotlight on Service: Medicaid Transportation

Medicaid Transportation
In Georgia, and anywhere in the United States for that matter, Medicaid covers non-emergency transportation to Medicaid members who need access to medical care or services. Eligible Medicaid members must contact the broker serving their county three days in advance of their appointment to schedule transportation. Each broker has a toll free number to schedule transportation and is available Monday through Friday from 7am to 6pm.

Medicaid Brokers

How To: Add Language To Your Daily Routines

Sara spends hours on the bus with Harry every week, to and from services, work, and daycare. Here is a language lesson that any parent like Sara could use to incorporate language into their daily bus ride.


HOW TO: Add language to a bus or train ride

https://www.atlantaspeechschool.org/TALK

  1. Using the TALK strategy: Become a narrator of your child’s world by using the TALK strategy and Tune In, Ask Questions, Lift the Language, and Keep it Going to what your child is looking at and naming it or describing what’s happening.
  2. Vocabulary: Tier 1 words (basic words) for younger children or children with 1-2 spoken/signed words (i.e. trees, cars, bus, train, people, eating, running, jumping, let’s hurry, uh oh!) and Tier 2 words for older children (3 years and up) or children with 3 or more words spoken or signed

101 Tier 2 Words:

1. Abundance- more than enough of something

2. Admire- to like the way something looks

3. Advice- what you think someone should do

4. Annoy- to bother

5. Appear-to show up

6. Arrange- to put something in order

7. Arrive- to get somewhere

8. Assist- to help

9. Astonished- very surprised

10. Attentive- pay attention

11. Available- ready to be used

12. Avoid- stay away from

13. Brief- a short time

14. Cautious- careful

15. Collect- to get things together; to pick up things that belong together

16. Combine- to mix or put together

17. Comfort- to make feel better

18. Comfortable- to feel good

19. Communicate- to let someone know what you think or feel

20. Compare- to see how things are alike and different

21. Complete- finish

22. Concentrate- to think about something really hard

23. Concerned- worried

24. Confused- when you don’t understand

25. Contain- to have or hold something inside

26. Corner- the point where 2 sides come together

27. Correct- right

28. Create- to make

29. Curious- want to know

30. Dangerous- not safe

31. Delighted- happy

32. Demonstrate- to show how to do something

33. Describe- to tell about something

34. Destroy- to tear up; to ruin

35. Determined- to keep working at something until you get what you want; to not give up

36. Difficult -hard to do

37. Disappear- to go away

38. Disappointed- upset because things did not work out the way you wanted them to

39. Discover- to find out about something

40. Dispose- to throw away; get rid of

41. Eager- really ready for something to happen

42. Edible- you can eat it

43. Enormous- really big

44. Entire- the whole thing; all of something

45. Envy- want what somebody else has

46. Equal- the same as

47. Event- something that happens

48. Except- all but

49. Excited- really happy about something; having a lot of energy

50. Expect- to think something will happen

51. Expensive- cost a lot of money

52. Extraordinary- really special; very different and wonderful

53. Familiar- you’ve seen it before or you already know it

54. Famous- known by a lot of people

55. Fancy- really special

56. Favorite- the one you like best

57. Fewer- not as many

58. Fragile- breaks or gets hurt easily; not strong

59. Frustrated- feeling upset when you keep trying to do something but it doesn’t work

60. Identical – the same in every way; exactly the same

61. Ignore- not pay attention to

62. Imitate- do the same thing somebody else does

63. Immense- really big; huge

64. Impossible- can’t be done

65. Introduce- to show for the first time; to meet for the first time

66. Invisible- you can’t see it

67. Locate- to find

68. Marvelous- wonderful

69. Observe- to watch carefully

70. Occupied- being used by someone else

71. Ordinary- plain; regular; not special

72. Organize- to put in good order

73. Patient- to wait nicely

74. Peculiar- strange

75. Pleased- happy with something

76. Plenty- a large amount; a lot

77. Popular- liked by a lot of people

78. Predict-to say or to guess what is going to happen

79. Problem- when something goes wrong

80. Protect- to keep safe

81. Protect- to keep safe

82. Proud- to feel good about yourself; to feel good about something you did

83. Purchase- to buy

84. Recall- to remember

85. Remain- to stay

86. Remove- take away

87. Repair- to fix

88. Repeat- to do again

89. Ridiculous- very silly

90. Select- to choose

91. Separate- take apart

92. Similar- the same in some ways but not all

93. Simple- easy to do

94. Solution- a way to fix something that went wrong

95. Supplies- things you need

96. Transfer- to move from one place to another

97. Unusual- different; really special; not familiar

98. Useful- can be used a lot

99. Vanish- to go away fast

100. Variety- different kinds of one thing

101. Visible- you can see it